The ancient Red Sea port of Adulis, Eritrea

results of the Eritro-British Expedition, 2004-5
  • 145 Pages
  • 2.38 MB
  • 4300 Downloads
  • English

Oxbow Books, Available from the David Brown Book Co. , Oxford, UK, Oakville, CT
Excavations (Archaeology) -- Eritrea, Harbors -- Eritrea -- History, Eritrea -- Antiquities, Aksum (Kingdom) -- Commerce -- History, Red Sea Coast (Eritrea) -- Commerce -- Hi
Statementedited by David Peacock and Lucy Blue ; assisted by Darren Glazier ; illustrations by Julian Whitewright, Jillian Phillips and Penny Copeland.
ContributionsPeacock, D. P. S., Blue, Lucy Katherine., Glazier, Darren., Whitewright, Julian., Phillips, Jillian., Copeland, Penny.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDT393.35 .A53 2007
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 145 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22561390M
ISBN 101842173081
ISBN 139781842173084
LC Control Number2008299861

By Yohannes Gebreyesus and Isaias Tesfazghi The ancient port city of Adulis is located on the Red Sea coast of Eritrea, on the crossroads for trade between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean. The Ancient Red Sea Port of Adulis, Eritrea: Report of the Etritro-British Expedition, Paperback – Novem by D.

Peacock (Author), Evan Peacock (Author), Lucy Blue (Author) See all formats and editionsPrice: $ The port of Adulis was one of greatest significance in Antiquity. It is best known for its role in Aksumite trade during the fourth - seventh centuries AD.

However it is also a major port of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, a sailors' hand-book of the first century by: According to Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, Adulis was the port of the Kingdom of Aksum, located on the coast of the Red Sea.

Adulis Bay is named after the port. It is thought that the modern town of Zula may be the Adulis of Aksumite times, as Zula may reflect the native name for the Greek “Adulis.”.

Review of The Ancient Red Sea Port of Adulis and the Eritrean Coastal Region: Previous Investigations and Museum Collections (by C. Zazzaro). Azania 50(3) The Ancient Port of Adulis: Travel to Eritrea If you are planning your travel to Eritrea, you must think of visiting the ancient port of Adulis.

Adulis is also known as Adulis, present in Eritrea, an ancient port and historical site.

Details The ancient Red Sea port of Adulis, Eritrea PDF

This city is located on the seashore of the Red Sea, and it. Aksum is mentioned in the first-century AD Periplus of the Erythraean Sea as an important market place for the trade in ivory, which was exported throughout the ancient states that the ruler of Aksum in the first century was Zoskales, who, besides ruling the kingdom, likewise controlled land near the Red Sea: Adulis (near Massawa) and lands through the highlands of present-day Eritrea.

Adulis, as port, has been the gateway for people, ideas, goods and powers that had a major impact on the history of the Eritrean and Ethiopian highlands from the 1st millennium BC onwards. The formation of the early Ethio- Sabean society reflects mutual cultural exchanges occurred among the opposite coasts of the Red Sea.

Inhabited since at least the 6th century BC, the site is the oldest in Eritrea. Adulis’ importance lay in its port, and by the 3rd century AD the port had grown to become one of the most important on the Red Sea. Trade of this time flourished from the Mediterranean all the way to India.

The Ancient Red Sea Port of Adulis, Eritrea Report of the Etritro-British Expedition, by D. Peacock,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.3/5(1). The series of books takes an emblem of antiquity, in this case an inscribed marble throne at the Ethiopian port of Adulis, described by a sixth-century Christian merchant known as Cosmas Indicopleustes (a name given to him by the eleventh century; it is Reviews: The port of Adulis was one of greatest significance in Antiquity.

It is best known for its role in Aksumite trade during the fourth - seventh centuries AD. However it is also a major port of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, a sailors' hand-book of the first century AD.

Compre o livro The Ancient Red Sea Port of Adulis, Eritrea: Report of the Etritro-British Expedition, na : confira as ofertas para livros em inglês e importadosFormat: Capa Comum.

Massawa - Pearl in the Red Sea Massawa was originally a small seaside village, lying in lands coextensive with the Kingdom of Axum in antiquity and overshadowed by the nearby port of Adulis about 50 kilometres (31 mi) to the a is a city on the Red Sea coast of Eritrea located at the northern end of the Gulf of Zula beside the Dahlak.

The port of Adulis was one of greatest significance in Antiquity. It is best known for its role in Aksumite trade during the fourth - seventh centuries AD.

However it is also a major port of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, a sailors' hand-book of the first century : D. Peacock, Evan Peacock, Lucy Blue.

It has revealed many new insights about the region as well as international trade in the ancient world. The History of Adulis, Eritrea. The date of the foundation of the port is not known.

Download The ancient Red Sea port of Adulis, Eritrea FB2

It is, however, believed to date from to BC as a port in the same area as Adulis is mentioned in the records of the 18 th Egyptian Dynasty. The Ancient Red Sea Port of Adulis, Eritrea Report of the Etritro-British Expedition, by D. Peacock, Evan Peacock, Lucy Blue D.

PeacockBrand: Oxbow Books. The port of Adulis was one of greatest significance in Antiquity. It is best known for its role in Aksumite trade during the fourth - seventh centuries AD. However it is also a major port of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, a sailors' hand-book of the first century : Oxbow Books.

The Ancient Red Sea Port of Adulis, Eritrea. Book Description: The port of Adulis was one of greatest significance in Antiquity. It is best known for its role in Aksumite trade during the fourth - seventh centuries AD.

However it is also a major port of the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, a sailors' hand-book of the first century AD. Adulis or Aduli (Αδουλίς in Ancient Greek) is an archeological site in the Northern Red Sea region of Eritrea, situated about 30 miles south of Massawa in the Gulf of Zula. It was the port considered part of the Kingdom of Aksum, located on the coast of the Red Sea.

The surveys of in Adulis by the National Museum of Eritrea, University of Asmara, University of Southampton and the Northern Red Sea Museum have identified eight types of amphora ceramics dated 2 millennium BC to 7th C AD, which were imported from Greek, Egypt, Tunisia, Italy and the highlands of Eritrea.

During the 3rd and 4th century AD, Eritrea was part of the kingdom of Axum which spread from Meroe in Sudan right across the Red Sea to Yemen. The capital of Axum was in the highlands of Tigray (now a province in Ethiopia), and the main port was at Adulis which is now called Zula in Eritrea.

Report of the Etritro-British Expedition,The Ancient Red Sea Port of Adulis, Eritrea, Lucy Blue, D. Peacock, Evan Peacock, Oxbow Books. Des milliers de livres avec la livraison chez vous en 1 jour ou en magasin avec -5% de réduction.

Adulis, also known as Aduli, is an ancient archaeological site which is located in the northern part of the Red Sea, and it is officially nowadays in the central coastal part of the State of Eritrea.

Serving mainly as a port that had high importance during the antiquity period, it is best known for its role in the trade during the rule of the Kingdom of Aksum, with its peak being between 4 and. The Italo-Eritrean archaeological mission began with its work in and has already brought to light the ancient port of Adulis in Eritrea, on the shores of the Red Sea.

An important seaport considering that that city communicated the Indian Ocean with the Mediterranean Sea, comparable to the route of the spices or the silk.

Adulis, Adoulis, Utulis, port of the Axoumites, on R Taranta Zula, on R wadi Haddas. The Periplus Maris Erythraei locates Adulis at stadia ( km) South of Ptolemaïs inside a South facing bay, which corresponds to Zula at 15°15’ of latitude.

In any case, the sea power of Axum waned and security for the Red Sea fell on other shoulders. Adulis was one of the first Axumite sites to undergo excavation, when a French mission to Eritrea under Vignaud and Petit performed an initial survey inand prepared a map which marked the location of the structures they believed were temples.

The ancient port city of Adulis is located on the Red Sea coast of Eritrea, on the crossroads for trade between the Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean. It is mentioned in a number of Classical and Byzantine sources, together with other Red Sea ports, such as Berenike (Egypt), Myos Hormos (Quseir, Egypt), first and later with Clysma (Ismaylia.

Foundations of the 5th century Byzantine church in Adulis / David Stanley, Flickr / CC BY Adel – Northern Red Sea.

Ruins of pre-Islamic settlement in Dahlak Kebir island. Site contains remnants of streets, standing stones of ancient structures, grinding stones, necropolis. Site is unexplored and may bring many interesting discoveries.

Slave Trade and Exotic Animals Made the Ancient Port of Adulis Rich The Red Sea coast has traditionally been one of the world’s great crossroads for trade and a meeting place of cultures. Because of this, there are many notable ports on this north-eastern coast of.

Description The ancient Red Sea port of Adulis, Eritrea PDF

The ancient port and archeological sites of Adulis make Eritrea the most popular country for archeologists. Adulis is 59 kilometers south of the modern sea-port Massawa. The ancient port of Adulis, in the 3rd century A.D, was one of the busiest ports linking the Greek, Roman, Byzantium Empires of the north to Africa, Arabia, India, and China in.The Throne of Adulis vividly recreates the Red Sea world of Late Antiquity, transporting readers back to a remote but pivotal epoch in ancient history, one that sheds light on the collapse of the Persian Empire as well as the rise of Islam.Book review of The ancient Red Sea port of Adulis and the Eritrean coastal region: previous investigations and museum collections (by Chiara Zazzaro).

Jonathan R. Walz. Jonathan R. Walz. Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa 50(3)